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storing skills per player?


Atijaf
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Currently, I am testing how to store specific skill levels and xp in classes.  I know this won't be saved to a file and that it will be lost on restart.(Learning this will be later)

 

What I'm currently trying to figure out is how to store levels for each player.  Right now, if I level up, everyone else does too.

Would I create an instance of a class when a player joins? (This is the only thing I can think of)

 

Feel free to ask me questions if you need clarification on what I'm trying to figure out.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.  Thanks

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Thanks for such a quick reply.

 

I Implemented IExtendedEntityProperties, but am unsure how to differentiate between each instance each player has.

 

 

public class WoodCutting implements IExtendedEntityProperties{

public int level;

public int xp;

 

public WoodCutting(){

this.level = 1;

this.xp = 0;

}

 

private int getLevel(){

return this.level;

}

 

private int getXp(){

return this.xp;

}

 

private void addXp(int amount){

this.xp += amount;

}

 

 

public void giveXp(int amount, EntityPlayer player){

addXp(amount);

while(Experience.RequiredXp(this.level, this.xp)){

this.level++;

CustomMessage.SendPlayerLevelUpMessage(level, "WoodCutting", player);

}

}

 

@Override

public void saveNBTData(NBTTagCompound compound) {

// TODO Auto-generated method stub

 

}

@Override

public void loadNBTData(NBTTagCompound compound) {

// TODO Auto-generated method stub

 

}

@Override

public void init(Entity entity, World world) {

// TODO Auto-generated method stub

 

}

}

 

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The tricky part is how to associate it to a player so it persists after you die or leave game. A lot of people don't realize it, but I'm pretty sure the EntityPlayer instance is made new every time you join the server. Its association to a username is temporary for the session. The server does save the extended properties, but from a programming point of view that information isn't loaded into same instance, but rather a fresh instance which doesn't check username before loading.

 

So in CoolAlias' tutorial, he creates the extended properties such that it contains a hashmap of extended properties keyed to the username. In other words, the extended properties will first contain extended properties for the first username that plays, then it will add if/when other players play.

 

Anyway, that's the part to pay attention to, and also the reason why just making extended entity properties for players is a bit complicated.

 

Another note: you don't have to worry about the persistence of the extended properties if the properties are supposed to be used for temporary purposes within game. For example, if you had an extended property for "mana", you might decide it is easier to allow user to start every session with full mana bar instead of remembering it depending on your mod's gameplay concept.

Check out my tutorials here: http://jabelarminecraft.blogspot.com/

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@jabelar Actually, that part of the tutorial is deprecated. There is a much better way to handle it, and that is PlayerEvent.Clone. This is fired each time a new player instance is created and provides you with both the old instance and the new one, giving you the perfect opportunity to copy whatever data you had in your IEEP class to the new instance.

 

The only thing to keep in mind at that point is that if the client needs to be aware of that data, you still need to send a packet after cloning, and the best place (imo) to do so is in EntityJoinWorldEvent.

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@jabelar Actually, that part of the tutorial is deprecated. There is a much better way to handle it, and that is PlayerEvent.Clone. This is fired each time a new player instance is created and provides you with both the old instance and the new one, giving you the perfect opportunity to copy whatever data you had in your IEEP class to the new instance.

 

Cool. But that still supports my point -- that it is a new instance that needs to get stuff copied over from previous. I've seen a lot of posts in past couple days (like first response on this thread) where it is clear that some people don't realize that programmatically it is a new/clone instance.

 

 

Check out my tutorials here: http://jabelarminecraft.blogspot.com/

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