Jump to content

[1.8] Getting started


justin_393

Recommended Posts

I have recently decided to start modding, but I can't find out how to get started. I have my workspace setup, but I can't find any updated tutorials for 1.8 Everything is for practically 1.6. If anyone knows where some tutorials (preferrably text) are, or some Java Docs, it would be greatly appreciated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.minecraftforge.net/forum/index.php/topic,26267.0.html

 

Best starter you will find if you know at least basics of object-coding (Java).

Thank you so much! The one thing I've noticed with Forge is a lack of documentation, as I've been wanting to mod for some time, but can't find out how to start. In regards to knowing basics of an Object oriented language, I've been developing in Java for approximately 2 years now and have made numerous Bukkit plugins :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Forge will never have good docs, but it's alredy well-documented in-code so I don't think it's needed. Why? Because it changes like - all the time and noone has time to follow this.

 

Anything out of basics I linked you (which should get you out of noob-coding) can be found here (ask), on forums.

 

This is also pretty useful:

http://greyminecraftcoder.blogspot.co.at/p/list-of-topics.html

 

Have a nice coding.

1.7.10 is no longer supported by forge, you are on your own.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Forge will never have good docs, but it's alredy well-documented in-code so I don't think it's needed. Why? Because it changes like - all the time and noone has time to follow this.

Ah well, that's not quite true I think :)

The vanilla minecraft code has poor documentation because it changes all the time, not much to be done about that.  Most of the time, it's most helpful to think of a vanilla object that does something similar to what you want, then go look at the code for it.

 

But the "Forge" packages have patchy documentation because many of the contributors haven't taken the time to document their stuff properly.  As a result, you've got to hunt through the implementation code to try and figure out how to use the classes and methods correctly.  Some are a lot better than others, but it's very rare for them to be up to the standard of, say, the java.util package.

 

The bigger picture stuff such as overviews, example implementations or test cases, etc is almost totally missing, which is where the various tutorial and sample code lying around the place can be helpful (its quality is highly variable!).  Once you've amassed a certain amount of knowledge, the rest becomes easier to find, the problem is sticking with it long enough (and having the temper control to not punch your screen in after wasting an entire day chasing a red herring).

 

You might find this tutorial project a useful base to start working from.

https://github.com/TheGreyGhost/MinecraftByExample

 

-TGG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Forge will never have good docs, but it's alredy well-documented in-code so I don't think it's needed. Why? Because it changes like - all the time and noone has time to follow this.

Ah well, that's not quite true I think :)

The vanilla minecraft code has poor documentation because it changes all the time, not much to be done about that.  Most of the time, it's most helpful to think of a vanilla object that does something similar to what you want, then go look at the code for it.

 

But the "Forge" packages have patchy documentation because many of the contributors haven't taken the time to document their stuff properly.  As a result, you've got to hunt through the implementation code to try and figure out how to use the classes and methods correctly.  Some are a lot better than others, but it's very rare for them to be up to the standard of, say, the java.util package.

 

The bigger picture stuff such as overviews, example implementations or test cases, etc is almost totally missing, which is where the various tutorial and sample code lying around the place can be helpful (its quality is highly variable!).  Once you've amassed a certain amount of knowledge, the rest becomes easier to find, the problem is sticking with it long enough (and having the temper control to not punch your screen in after wasting an entire day chasing a red herring).

 

You might find this tutorial project a useful base to start working from.

https://github.com/TheGreyGhost/MinecraftByExample

 

-TGG

where can I find the implementation stuff? Sorry if I'm coming off as mildly stupid, I'm used to Bukkit where every tiny feature is documented :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've written a couple - the tutorial project I mentioned, as well as some overview information here

http://greyminecraftcoder.blogspot.com.au/p/list-of-topics.html

 

You can often find snippets by googling, or in here

http://www.minecraftforge.net/forum/index.php/board,120.0.html

 

I've only ever stumbled over one test case in Forge. 

https://github.com/MinecraftForge/MinecraftForge/blob/master/src/test/java/net/minecraftforge/debug/ModelBakeEventDebug.java

 

I'm sure they have them for regression testing and such, but I never went looking too hard I must admit.

 

Other mods can be good if they're open source (most of them are)... can be very hit and miss though.

 

-TGG

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.