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How to correctly define blocks using Forge


Axalto

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I was following this tutorial but since it stopped there I continued using this tutorial.

Now I'm trying to change the hardness of a block but because "setHardness()" is protected I can't use that. (the first tutorial told me to keep the code separated in a separate package)

I'm probably doing it entirely wrong so I would like to ask: how should I do it?

I did try to search around but could not find a good tutorial for forge anywhere.

 

mod_MailCraft.java

package net.minecraft.src.mailcraft;

import net.minecraft.src.forge.NetworkMod;
import net.minecraft.src.Block;
import net.minecraft.src.ModLoader;

// This is the class that will be loaded by mod loader and it must be
// prefixed with mod_ for mod loader to find it.
public class mod_MailCraft extends NetworkMod
{
// Block Definitions
public static Block blockMailbox;

// This method is used to get the version of your mod as a string.
@Override
public String getVersion()
{
	return "MailCraft 1.0.0 BETA";
}

// This method is where the mod gets loaded.
// Insert initialization of blocks, items, etc. in here.
@Override
public void load()
{
	MailCraftConfig.InitializeConfig("MailCraft");

	// Defines the Mailbox block with block ID 201 (TODO: change to config ID) and a texture override
	blockMailbox = (new BlockMailbox(201, ModLoader.addOverride("/terrain.png", "/MailCraft/mailbox.png"))
						.setHardness(3F) //<- Here is the problem
						).setBlockName("Mailbox");
}
}

 

BlockMailbox.java

package net.minecraft.src.mailcraft;

import net.minecraft.src.Block;
import net.minecraft.src.Material;

public class BlockMailbox extends Block
{
public BlockMailbox(int par1, int par2)
    {
        super(par1, par2, Material.wood);
    }
}

My tutorial series on the wiki has been discontinued until I get the hang of forge for 3.1.x and just everything from forge in general.

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Thanks, I looked at the tutorials you suggested and they look like they will send me on the right track. I'll also try to contribute a block tutorial to the forge wiki when I get it working myself tomorrow morning.  :)

My tutorial series on the wiki has been discontinued until I get the hang of forge for 3.1.x and just everything from forge in general.

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Thanks, I looked at the tutorials you suggested and they look like they will send me on the right track. I'll also try to contribute a block tutorial to the forge wiki when I get it working myself tomorrow morning.  :)

Don't call the block constructor in the load(). Just do the whole thing in the declaration.

So, what would happen if I did push that shiny red button over there? ... Really? ... Can I try it? ... Damn.

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I was wondering, in Helfull's block tutorial, why is the name of the block defined in the mod main file while the texture pack is defined in the block, shouldn't it be the other way around for keeping code organized and for optimalization?

Edit: after continuing to see how the texture system works I think I understand why the texture is there, but the name is still a mystery to me.

My tutorial series on the wiki has been discontinued until I get the hang of forge for 3.1.x and just everything from forge in general.

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Thanks, I looked at the tutorials you suggested and they look like they will send me on the right track. I'll also try to contribute a block tutorial to the forge wiki when I get it working myself tomorrow morning.  :)

Don't call the block constructor in the load(). Just do the whole thing in the declaration.

Wouldn't the configuration class first need to initialize before the block constructors can be called since there the block ID is defined?

My tutorial series on the wiki has been discontinued until I get the hang of forge for 3.1.x and just everything from forge in general.

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Thanks, I looked at the tutorials you suggested and they look like they will send me on the right track. I'll also try to contribute a block tutorial to the forge wiki when I get it working myself tomorrow morning.  :)

Don't call the block constructor in the load(). Just do the whole thing in the declaration.

Wouldn't the configuration class first need to initialize before the block constructors can be called since there the block ID is defined?

 

Just have the first declaration call the configuration's "Create, set, etc" function, and have said function return the first declaration's ID.

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Thanks, I looked at the tutorials you suggested and they look like they will send me on the right track. I'll also try to contribute a block tutorial to the forge wiki when I get it working myself tomorrow morning.  :)

Don't call the block constructor in the load(). Just do the whole thing in the declaration.

Wouldn't the configuration class first need to initialize before the block constructors can be called since there the block ID is defined?

 

Just have the first declaration call the configuration's "Create, set, etc" function, and have said function return the first declaration's ID.

What is the advantage of calling the constructor at definition over calling it at the load()anyways? Or would it be better to split the constructor of the block into a constructor and a separate load() in the block class?

My tutorial series on the wiki has been discontinued until I get the hang of forge for 3.1.x and just everything from forge in general.

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Thanks, I looked at the tutorials you suggested and they look like they will send me on the right track. I'll also try to contribute a block tutorial to the forge wiki when I get it working myself tomorrow morning.  :)

Don't call the block constructor in the load(). Just do the whole thing in the declaration.

Wouldn't the configuration class first need to initialize before the block constructors can be called since there the block ID is defined?

 

Just have the first declaration call the configuration's "Create, set, etc" function, and have said function return the first declaration's ID.

What is the advantage of calling the constructor at definition over calling it at the load()anyways? Or would it be better to split the constructor of the block into a constructor and a separate load() in the block class?

 

Move it all into 1 line per block, since that makes your code much more legible.

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Thanks, I looked at the tutorials you suggested and they look like they will send me on the right track. I'll also try to contribute a block tutorial to the forge wiki when I get it working myself tomorrow morning.  :)

Don't call the block constructor in the load(). Just do the whole thing in the declaration.

Wouldn't the configuration class first need to initialize before the block constructors can be called since there the block ID is defined?

 

Just have the first declaration call the configuration's "Create, set, etc" function, and have said function return the first declaration's ID.

What is the advantage of calling the constructor at definition over calling it at the load()anyways? Or would it be better to split the constructor of the block into a constructor and a separate load() in the block class?

 

Move it all into 1 line per block, since that makes your code much more legible.

But it would all be placed wrong, errors will appear at the wrong moments and worst of all it will not be easily extendible with special functionality.

My tutorial series on the wiki has been discontinued until I get the hang of forge for 3.1.x and just everything from forge in general.

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